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Being asked to donate

The decision to become a living donor involves careful consideration and is a voluntary one. To help you through the process, consider reaching out to family members, close friends, someone who has gone through this process, or a social worker or counselor.

It may also be helpful to ask yourself these questions:

  • How do I feel about organ donation?
  • Can I afford to be a living donor?
  • What will my insurance cover?
  • Do I know enough to make a logical and educated decision?
  • Am I being psychologically pressured to be a living donor?
  • Is there someone else who could possibly donate?
  • If there is more than one possible donor, how will the living donor be chosen?
  • Will donation have an impact on my relationship with the recipient?
  • What are the medical risks involved?
  • How does my religion view organ donation?
  • Am I up to it physically? Are there current aspects of my health that I know should keep me from donating?
  • Do I have a “support network” to help me through this process?
  • How will I feel if I am rejected as a result of the screening process?
  • Am I prepared to deal with the possible rejection of the organ?

The transplant team often includes a third party advocate to help you explore your feelings and assess your emotional and financial preparedness for living donation. Be sure to consider these and other resources that may be available to you.

It is also important to know that you may change your mind at any time during the process. Your decision and reasons are kept confidential.

Reference and Publication Information

This Web site is intended solely for the purpose of electronically providing the public with general health-related information and convenient access to the data resources. UNOS is not affiliated with any one product nor does UNOS assume responsibility for any error, omissions or other discrepancies.

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